“CHARLOTTE DELBO. / ONE MEMORY, THOUSANDS VOICES”

03 Feb “CHARLOTTE DELBO. / ONE MEMORY, THOUSANDS VOICES”

Charlotte Delbo was born on 10 August 1913 in Vigneux-sur-Seine, Seine-et-Oise, to Charles Delbo, an iron carpenter, and Erménie Morero. She was the eldest of four children.
After sitting her Baccalaureate, she went on to study philosophy at the Sorbonne. There, she joined the Young Communists and met Georges Dudach, whom she married on 17 March 1936. She dropped out in 1937, and in 1939 became the secretary to actor and theatre director Louis Jouvet. In May 1941, she accompanied Jouvet’s troupe on tour around South America. Her husband, staying in France, joined the Communist Resistance.
In September 1941, in Buenos Aires, Charlotte received news that one of her friends, Jacques Woog, had been executed for “communist propaganda”. Revolted, she returned to France. In Paris, the couple joined the undercover movement. Charlotte copied out the communiqués from Radio-London and Radio-Moscow and worked for Les Lettres françaises, a literary publication founded by Jacques Decour.
On 2 March 1942, five French police officers from the Special Brigades arrested Charlotte and her husband. She was imprisoned in Prison de la Santé, where she learned, on 23 May, of Georges’ execution in Mont Valérien. On 17 August, she was transferred to Fort de Romainville, where she was kept prisoner with many other women, most of them communist, and then on to Fresnes a week later.
She was one of 230 women taken from Compiègne to Auschwitz on 24 January 1943. On 27 January, these women entered Auschwitz singing the Marseillaise. Initially quarantined in block 14 in Birkenau’s women’s camp, these women were then forced into hard labour, mainly in the swamps. Many of them died from typhus. By 3 August, only 57 of them were still alive. They were then put in quarantine. On 7 January 1944, Charlotte Delbo, accompanied by seven other deportees, was sent to Ravensbrück. She was sent to Furstenberg, in one of the kommandos in the main camp.
The majority of the survivors in her convoy were transferred to Ravensbrück in the summer of 1944. Thanks to assistance from the Red Cross, she was one of a group of women who managed to leave the camp on 23 April 1945 for Sweden and returned to France in 1945. Of the 230 women in the convoy of 24 January 1943, 49 survived.
While she recuperated in Switzerland, she wrote “Aucun de nous ne reviendra”, the first publication in her literary opus on the themes of deportation and the convoys sent from France to Auschwitz. It was not published until 1965 by Editions Gonthier.
After the war, she worked at the UN, then at the CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research). She died in March 1985, having published numerous works drawing on her experiences in the camps including: “Le convoi du 24 janvier” (1965), “Une connaissance inutile” (1970), “Mesure de nos jours” (1971, Editions de Minuit) and “Qui rapportera ses parole”s (1974, Edition P.J. Oswald).
In Modena city in Italy you can visit the exposition “Charlotte Delbo. Una memoria, mille voci”

 

Ciao a tutta la community, vorrei condividere con voi una mostra che ho visitato molto interessante.
Dal 23 gennaio 2016 è istituita la mostra “Charlotte Delbo. Una memoria, mille voci” Eventi a Modena”al San Filippo Neri dedicata alla vita della scrittrice Charlotte Delbo, deportata ad Auschwitz-
La mostra, curata da Elisabetta Ruffini e prodotta da Isrec di Bergamo e Centre de la Résistance et de la Déportation di Lione, evoca la figura e l’opera della scrittrice francese di origini italiane, partigiana e deportata ad Auschwitz e Ravensbrück, autrice di uno dei primi libri europei di memoria della deportazione, “Le convoi du 24 janvier”, solo da un decennio disponibile nella traduzione italiana.
Costruita a partire dagli archivi della scrittrice, depositati alla Bibliothèque nationale de France dalla sua erede universale Claudine Riera-Collet, la mostra si snoda tra esperienza vissuta e immaginario: venti scatole di cartone si aprono per creare altrettanti spazi dove meditare gli scritti e i documenti della vita di Delbo. Cinque sezioni circoscrivono nella mostra il cuore del delicato intreccio tra biografia e scrittura nata per testimoniare. Le prime due – “Una donna del XX secolo” e “Alle prese con la storia” – mettono in luce le radici biografiche della scrittura di Delbo. Da un lato i rapporti importanti della sua vita e dall’altro la sua esperienza di Resistenza e di deportazione, straordinaria non solo perché la Delbo sopravvisse al campo, ma anche perché con le compagne finì ad Auschwitz-Birkenau e la sua memoria non appartiene né agli ebrei né ai politici. La terza e la quarta sezione – “La letteratura come memoria” e “Memoria e vigilanza” – si concentrano sul lavoro di scrittura di Delbo, indagata nella sua sfida di raccontare agli altri l’esperienza vissuta in campo ma anche in quella di fare di questa memoria un principio di vigilanza sul presente, la sua violenza, le sue contraddizioni. Infine, l’ultima sezione – “L’eredità di una donna del XX secolo” – si interroga sull’eredità che Delbo lascia al XXI secolo. Completano la mostra i ritratti fotografici della scrittrice realizzati da Eric Schwab.
La mostra è visitabile gratuitamente dal 24 gennaio al 7 febbraio da lunedì a venerdì dalle 15 alle 19, sabato e domenica dalle 9 alle 13 e dalle 15 alle 19.
Mostra promossa da Istituto storico di Modena, Fondazione Collegio San Carlo e Fondazione Ex Campo Fossoli, nell’ambito delle iniziative per il Giorno della Memoria 2016, a cura del Comune di Modena – Comitato permanente per la memoria e le celebrazioni e Provincia di Modena
“On n’efface pas l’histoire, rien à faire. Un jour il faudra répondre aux questions des enfants” Charlotte Delbo

1Comment
  • PROTEA DIRITTI UMANI
    Posted at 18:27h, 03 February Reply

    Charlotte Delbo was born on 10 August 1913 in Vigneux-sur-Seine, Seine-et-Oise, to Charles Delbo, an iron carpenter, and Erménie Morero. She was the eldest of four children.
    After sitting her Baccalaureate, she went on to study philosophy at the Sorbonne. There, she joined the Young Communists and met Georges Dudach, whom she married on 17 March 1936. She dropped out in 1937, and in 1939 became the secretary to actor and theatre director Louis Jouvet. In May 1941, she accompanied Jouvet’s troupe on tour around South America. Her husband, staying in France, joined the Communist Resistance.
    In September 1941, in Buenos Aires, Charlotte received news that one of her friends, Jacques Woog, had been executed for “communist propaganda”. Revolted, she returned to France. In Paris, the couple joined the undercover movement. Charlotte copied out the communiqués from Radio-London and Radio-Moscow and worked for Les Lettres françaises, a literary publication founded by Jacques Decour.
    On 2 March 1942, five French police officers from the Special Brigades arrested Charlotte and her husband. She was imprisoned in Prison de la Santé, where she learned, on 23 May, of Georges’ execution in Mont Valérien. On 17 August, she was transferred to Fort de Romainville, where she was kept prisoner with many other women, most of them communist, and then on to Fresnes a week later.
    She was one of 230 women taken from Compiègne to Auschwitz on 24 January 1943. On 27 January, these women entered Auschwitz singing the Marseillaise. Initially quarantined in block 14 in Birkenau’s women’s camp, these women were then forced into hard labour, mainly in the swamps. Many of them died from typhus. By 3 August, only 57 of them were still alive. They were then put in quarantine. On 7 January 1944, Charlotte Delbo, accompanied by seven other deportees, was sent to Ravensbrück. She was sent to Furstenberg, in one of the kommandos in the main camp.
    The majority of the survivors in her convoy were transferred to Ravensbrück in the summer of 1944. Thanks to assistance from the Red Cross, she was one of a group of women who managed to leave the camp on 23 April 1945 for Sweden and returned to France in 1945. Of the 230 women in the convoy of 24 January 1943, 49 survived.
    While she recuperated in Switzerland, she wrote Aucun de nous ne reviendra, the first publication in her literary opus on the themes of deportation and the convoys sent from France to Auschwitz. It was not published until 1965 by Editions Gonthier.
    After the war, she worked at the UN, then at the CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research). She died in March 1985, having published numerous works drawing on her experiences in the camps including: Le convoi du 24 janvier (1965), Une connaissance inutile (1970), Mesure de nos jours (1971, Editions de Minuit) and Qui rapportera ses paroles (1974, Edition P.J. Oswald).
    In Modena city in Italy you can visit the exposition “Charlotte Delbo. Una memoria, mille voci”

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